Fort Hood: “A Failure of Imagination”

Some thoughts from Rick Moran:

It’s really quite simple, you see. The American government and the military are lousy with PC and we paid for our timidity in the face of evil with the lives of 14 brave soldiers.
Or, an equally simple explanation is that war and cruelty to Muslims drove Hasan over the edge so of course he snapped. That and the prospect that he was going to be sent to Iraq.
For the fringes, it’s even easier; the only good Muslim is a dead Muslim and, on the other side, it really is America’s fault that Hasan “went Muslim.”
You can box, wrap, and tie up in a bow explanations given by both right and left for why the Fort Hood attack occurred. They are that pat, that logical, that simple – so easy to understand in the context of ideology and partisanship that going beyond and digging a little deeper is discouraged because it might complicate things.
I am not satisfied by these explanations and you shouldn’t be either. There is a germ of truth in the explanations offered by both sides, but I think large gaps need to be filled in to prevent us from making Hasan a cartoonish representation of the Evil Muslim, or blameless victim.
[…]
Not wanting a repeat of the Japanese experience in World War II is not political correctness. But perhaps the way our government implemented policies to avoid that historical deja vu will be seen as having gone too far. Clearly, the Hasan case cries out for a thorough review by the military of its policies. But I suspect it wasn’t a policy failure that led to Hasan’s continued association with the Army but rather a failure of imagination on the part of his co-workers and friends who either fooled themselves into believing he wasn’t a killer, or dismissed his treasonous utterances as someone “just letting off steam.” The prospect that he would pick up guns and kill fellow soldiers was so far beyond the pale of imagination that those who knew of his views and heard his bloodcurdling threats never put two and two together, never made the psychic connection, between thought and act.

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7 thoughts on “Fort Hood: “A Failure of Imagination”

  1. Bullshit.It is black and white.There is a war being waged against the west under the nose of the willfully blind.The leftists are the ones enabling it, and handing out the blinders.

  2. Exactly, Kursk. Given that the US military has been tasked with fighting the war, it’s inexcusable that they left themselves open to a 5th columnist attacking from within. I’d go further and call it criminal negligence. A lot of senior officers should be worrying about their pensions…

  3. “I am not satisfied by these explanations and you shouldn’t be either. There is a germ of truth in the explanations offered by both sides, but I think large gaps need to be filled in to prevent us from making Hasan a cartoonish representation of the Evil Muslim, or blameless victim.”
    Moran sets-up a lot of straw men. (Reminds me of Mr. Dog.) Though I dig his point about failure of imagination… To recognize Hasan for what he was becoming, others had to be able to see it in full or to be able to project themselves there. It’s an honest failing.

  4. Dan,
    The Marines at Quantico carry on-base. Not all of ’em, but everyone knows that it would be folly to attempt something, er, contrary to proper decorum.

  5. Ran; I’m just gob smacked that isn’t S.O.P.
    It probably isn’t here either, the norm I mean.
    Someone recently commented that cops here DON’T carry their sidearms home with them; boy have I got news for that misinformed individual. I don’t personally know any cop who doesn’t take his weapon home; the rational being that a cop is never off duty. Sgt.Kim Munley is living proof of the truth of that.

  6. ‘For the fringes, it’s even easier; the only good Muslim is a dead Muslim and, on the other side, it really is America’s fault that Hasan “went Muslim.”’
    If the Left really is suggesting that this is America’s fault then it’s tantamount to “blaming the victim”.
    I thought violence was never justified.

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