Fun With Freemen

It’s tempting to write off the kooky “Freemen on the land” movement as a bunch of misguided but harmless eccentrics.  A woman in Alberta, however, is being deprived of her property by the “Senior Chief Justice at Tacit Supreme In Law Court for Sovran Nations Embassies and as Supervisor-Co-ordinator-Estimator of CPC Universal Group of Calgary Division.”  (Good luck fitting that on a business card.)

An Alberta pensioner says she feels like a prisoner after her rental property was claimed as an “embassy” by a man she says identified himself as a Freemen-on-the-Land, a growing movement of so-called sovereign citizens that is raising concerns with authorities both north and south of the border.

[…]

Caverhill rented half a duplex she owns in Calgary’s upscale Parkdale neighbourhood to a new tenant in November 2011 on the recommendation of a friend.

The renter, Andreas Pirelli, had recently moved to Calgary from Montreal and was a self-described handyman. She says he agreed to “spruce up” the property in return for three months of free rent.

What she thought was a good deal soon turned into a nightmare.

A few months after Pirelli moved in, Caverhill went to inspect the work and she says she found the entire kitchen and bathroom had been gutted. All the doors inside had been removed and the floor of the master bedroom had been painted black, she says.

But Caverhill quickly learned she had much bigger problems.

“He walks me to the door and he’s yelling at me, ’I’m a Freemen-on-the-Land,”’ Caverhill says.

“I said: ’This is my house, not yours.’ He said: ’No. This is an embassy house now and it’s mine and you have no rights’, so then he slams the door.”

She says she discovered the locks had been changed and pounded on the door.

“I said: ’How come the key doesn’t work?’ He said: ’I changed the locks.’ He said: ’It’s not your home.”’

Caverhill depends on the rental income to supplement her pension.

Pirelli, who sources confirm also went by the name Mario Antonacci, informed her he was willing to pay $775 a month in rent, less than half the $1,500 plus utilities that she says had been agreed to.

She says she later received an invoice from Pirelli’s company — CPC Universal Group — for $26,000 in work done to the home.

“I receive a thing in the mail from the Land Titles Office, that the property has been liened for $17,000,” she says.

Ms. Caverhill has called the police on several occasions, but she’s been told – correctly – that this is a landlord-tenant matter which should be dealt with in the civil courts.  Not that Pirelli would acknowledge a court order that he vacate the premises, but at least then the landlord would have an order which can be enforced by the authorities.

Any lawyers in Calgary up for some pro bono work?

Quackery “They” don’t want you to know about

You mean the guy who hawks “natural cures” on late-night infomercials is a lying sociopath?  I’m as shocked as you are.

A federal judge has sided with the Federal Trade Commission in granting a court-appointed receiver broad authority to marshal assets and take over businesses the judge ruled were controlled by controversial TV pitchman Kevin Trudeau, who last month was found in contempt for failing to pay a $37.6 million sanction against him for deceptive marketing.

[…]

The contempt finding was the third of Trudeau’s checkered career, which is also dotted with $2.5 million in prior settlements with the FTC over allegedly misleading claims for a host of products he pitched in infomercials. The 50-year-old Massachusetts native’s record also includes two felony fraud convictions from the early 1990’s, for which he spent nearly two years in federal prison.

[…]

Among the companies covered by the judge’s ruling is a multi-layered marketing foundation called the Global Information Network, known by the acronym GIN. It is billed as private wealth, health and success building club – boasting of thousands of members in more than 150 countries.

The club was conceived, Trudeau claims, by a secret council of 30 people – including anonymous billionaires, royals, high-level members of secret societies – and Kevin Trudeau. In internet videos, Trudeau pitched GIN as a way for members, who pay $1,000 to join and $150 a month in dues, to acquire secret information heretofore available to only the elite.

The club’s U.S. subsidiary, GIN USA, reported more than $60 million in gross revenue over the past three years, virtually all of which came from payments, purchases and upgrade fees from the club’s own members. It is not clear how much, if any, of that money remains. The receiver will now have to determine if GIN and its affiliated entities should be allowed to continuing to operate or should be shut down and have their assets liquidated.

Trudeau, who declined to answer questions about the latest contempt finding or the appointment of the receiver, has been ordered to surrender his U.S. and Italian passports. He will have to get by on whatever amount of money the receiver determines is sufficient for him to have ordinary and necessary living expenses. For the time being, he will be permitted to continue living in an expansive rental home in suburban Chicago.

Newtown troofers vs. an American hero

Gene Rosen sheltered six little children during the Sandy Hook massacre.  Now the conspiracy theorists are destroying his life:

A man who found six children in his driveway in Newtown, Conn., after their teacher had been shot and killed in last month’s school massacre has become the target of conspiracy theorists who believe the shootings were staged.

“I don’t know what to do,” Gene Rosen told Salon.com. “I’m getting hang-up calls, I’m getting some calls, I’m getting emails with, not direct threats, but accusations that I’m lying, that I’m a crisis actor, ‘How much am I being paid?’”

Rosen, a 69-year-old retired psychologist who lives near Sandy Hook Elementary School where the shootings took place, says his inbox is filled with emails like this one:

How are all those little students doing? You know, the ones that showed up at your house after the ‘shooting’. What is the going rate for getting involved in a gov’t sponsored hoax anyway?

“The quantity of the material is overwhelming,” Rosen said, adding that he’s sought the advice of a retired state police officer and plans to alert the FBI.

[…]

Rosen took the four girls and two boys—students of slain teacher Victoria Soto—into his home, gave them toys and comforted them while he tried to reach their parents. He spent the days following the massacre telling his story to the swarming media that invaded the small Connecticut town in the wake of the shootings.

“I wanted to speak about the bravery of the children,” Rosen told Salon. “I guess I kind of opened myself up to this.”

A quick Web search for Rosen’s name reveals some of what he’s opened himself up to: Appearing online are photos of his home, his address and phone number, several fake YouTube accounts and plenty of conspiracy theories.

There are no words that properly express how much I despise these people, some of whom are teaching our kids.