The Carter ruling is correct, though I don’t agree with it

The Supreme Court of Canada struck down the Criminal Code provisions making assisted suicide illegal: In a charter precedent that will go down in the history books as Carter vs. Canada, the court unanimously struck down the ban on providing a doctor-assisted death to mentally competent but suffering and "irremediable" patients. The emphatic, unanimous ruling prompted … Continue reading The Carter ruling is correct, though I don’t agree with it

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Blasphemy is a crime in Canada

Not because we're living under the Stephen Harper Christofascist dictatorship, though. (Sorry, Michael Harris.)  It's actually a law that hasn't been enforced successfully since 1935, but remains part of the Criminal Code of Canada: Section 296 of the Criminal Code makes “blasphemous libel” punishable by up to two years in jail in Canada. No one … Continue reading Blasphemy is a crime in Canada

It’s dirty work (and lawyers get to do it)

Canadian Lawyer's Gail Cohen praises the late Doug Christie for representing people many lawyers wouldn't touch: Christie, often called The Battling Barrister or Counsel for the Damned, became notorious for his defence of some of the most reviled hatemongers in the country. His clients included holocaust denier Ernst Zundel, former Nazi guard Michael Seifert, fascist … Continue reading It’s dirty work (and lawyers get to do it)

“How About Defending Speech Because It’s Speech, Not Because You Agree With It?”

I want to print this post from Popehat, frame it and mount it on my wall. ...Say that someone sues, or threatens, or abuses someone whose ideas you despise, someone whose good faith you doubt, someone working for political or social ends you are struggling against. If that censor is successful in any measure, are you harmed? Yes. You are … Continue reading “How About Defending Speech Because It’s Speech, Not Because You Agree With It?”

The other “Jesus shirt” case

Nova Scotians who followed the "Life is Wasted Without Jesus" controversy may be interested in this markedly similar case from Ohio, where a student's T-shirt was banned because of a controversial religious message. The difference? In the Ohio case, the shirt read, "Jesus is Not a Homophobe."