Slow justice is no justice

A New Brunswick judge has been “mildly chastised” by the Canadian Judicial Council for taking so long to render her decisions:

Court of Queen’s Bench Justice Paulette Garnett was the subject of a complaint by an unknown person to the judicial council last spring, a year after CBC News reported on several of her overdue decisions.

But she will face no disciplinary action for bogging down the judicial system, according to a decision released on Tuesday.

“The judge had been very late in issuing reasons in a number of cases,” the council said in a press release.

“Undue delays in rendering decisions can lessen public confidence in our justice system. … The judge has acknowledged that she needs to do better in future, She is working to ensure that this situation does not happen again.”

Garnett was appointed in 1998 and almost immediately began violating judicial council guidelines, which call for delivering judgments within six months of the conclusion of a hearing.

One of her first cases, a claim for back rent at the Bathurst Supermall made in August of 1998 wasn’t decided on for nearly 13 months.

That became a familiar pattern to lawyers and parties in her courtroom for years to come.

In 2005, she presided over a one-day hearing between Fredericton’s old Elm City Chrysler dealership, its owners and their bank to resolve questionable transactions. She delivered a decision two years and two months later.

In 2012, she took so long to decide whether employees of Fredericton’s Jones Masonry had properly unionized, Gordon Petrie, the company’s lawyer, eventually died.

That’ll show her.

(via @BobTarantino)

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